bullet.behaviour
May 23, 2017

Premium Bullets: Peregrine Bullets

5 comments

 

 

Andries
Jun 20, 2017Edited: Aug 30, 2017

These excellent bullets were my first introduction to the South African made premium bullets. I have nothing but praise for them - from 400gr VRG-2 solids in the .416 Rigby to 168gr VRG-3 Bushmaster in my .303.

 

I had occasion to visit their production facility in Pretoria and it is a pleasure to see the C&C machines in action, as well as the three stages of human-measured quality assurance processes.

 

As life goes I met a rather well-known South Africa personality in the hunting world at a shooting range while they were preparing for a Cape buffalo hunt with their brand new SAKO .375 H&H rifles and 300gr Peregrine VRG-2 and VRG-3 bullets. When I spoke to him again some weeks after the hunt he had nothing but total disdain for the bullet's performance.

 

When I responded that I find it hard to imagine a standard shooting angle on Cape buffalo where a properly placed 300gr Peregrine VRG-2/3 at 2,600 ft/sec from a .375 H&H will not function 100% perfectly on Cape buffalo he just said he will never buy it again. Knowing the individual I shall reserve my judgement on that review.

Andries
Aug 30, 2017Edited: Aug 30, 2017

Here are my questions for Peregrine bullets:

 

First question - please tell us about the original reason for your expander plunger concept and the subsequent history of Peregrine bullets.

 

2. We know that you have a dedicated distributor in the USA and a number of retail outlets. Which states in the USA are your largest markets? What about Europe?

 

3. What was the bottom line of your bullet design to achieve international recognition for not only accuracy but also consistent penetration and weight retention performance?

 

4. What were the drivers for the nose section designs of your VRG-2/3 series bullets? Also for the VRG-4/5?

 

5. The new very high aspect ratio bullets look almost shockingly slender. Please tell us about the intended market for this bullet and the most sought after calibres and weights.

 

6. Copper bullet surface coating to decreases friction: Flat surface monolithic copper bullets have a higher friction coefficient than a thin copper jacket on lead. It is known that Molybdenum Disulphide interacts with the atmosphere to form corrosive substances in the barrel. Boron Nitride and Tungsten Disulphide are other options. Please share some of your thinking regarding this issue and subsequent decision to not coat your bullets?

 

7. Regarding the above issue of the effect of surface friction on bullet inertia: some manufacturers of these like Barnes and Swift give the valid advice to seat the first contact radial of the bullet some distance short of the rifling. Please can you share the Peregrine advice regarding this important issue for reloaders?

 

After we have received the response from Peregrine Bullets member no doubt will post their own unique questions here.

peregrinemonolithics
Aug 30, 2017

 

First question - please tell us about the original reason for your expander plunger concept and the subsequent history of Peregrine bullets.

 

https://www.peregrinemonolithics.com/about-peregrine-bullets/

 

2. We know that you have a dedicated distributor in the USA and a number of retail outlets. Which states in the USA are your largest markets? What about Europe?

 

Peregrine Bullets are available for sale at: https://www.peregrinemonolithics.com/shop/

 

Peregrine machined copper bullets were designed from the ground up with internal, external and terminal ballistics in mind.  As such they are "green", which is advantageous in Europe, California and other places like the Arizona Kaibab plateau around the Grand Canyon where Condors are being reintroduced.  With Peregrine's "green" precision-machined all-copper bullets, performance is enhanced due to the 15% density decrease from copper to lead.  Force = Mass x Acceleration (F=ma).  Thus the same powder charge can accelerate the same form-factor bullet (same BC) to increased muzzle velocity and thus flatter trajectory.  Given the mechanical expander, Peregrine bullets also exhibit superior terminal performance upon impact.  Tradition is the greatest inertia in switching to Peregrine's superior bullets which also happens to be environmentally friendly.

Download: Peregrine Monolithics California Non-Lead Certified Bullets

 

3. What was the bottom line of your bullet design to achieve international recognition for not only accuracy but also consistent penetration and weight retention performance?

 

https://www.peregrinemonolithics.com/about-peregrine-bullets/

 

4. What were the drivers for the nose section designs of your VRG-2/3 series bullets? Also for the VRG-4/5?

 

The VRG-2 is a solid flat meplat, which is paired with the expander equipped flat meplat VRG-3 BushMaster.  These bullets are meant for use in dense brush.  For longer range applications the brass-tipped spitzer VRG-4 PlainsMaster hunting bullet is complemented by it's non-hunting twin, the VRG-5 Match.  Thus a cheaper solid can be used for load development and target shooting, but when it comes time for hunting, the same powder charge and seating depth can be used with confidence with the more expensive, meticulously assembled VRG-3 and VRG-4 hunting tips.  Flat meplat bullets cause maximum damage upon impact due to fluid displacement perpendicular to bullet penetration, but the bullet shape trades off external ballistics (lower BC) against superior terminal ballistics.  Spitzer bullets on the other hand trade some terminal ballistic performance for improved external ballistics (higher BC).  The hunting application determines the bullet choice.

 

5. The new very high aspect ratio bullets look almost shockingly slender. Please tell us about the intended market for this bullet and the most sought after calibers and weights.

 

https://www.peregrinemonolithics.com/rangemaster-reloading-bullets/

 

6. Copper bullet surface coating to decreases friction: Flat surface monolithic copper bullets have a higher friction coefficient than a thin copper jacket on lead. It is known that Molybdenum Disulphide interacts with the atmosphere to form corrosive substances in the barrel. Boron Nitride and Tungsten Disulphide are other options. Please share some of your thinking regarding this issue and subsequent decision to not coat your bullets?

 

Much has been made of bullet coatings. Peregrine cannot suggest or endorse a specific type of coating, simply because the coating process is outside of Peregrine's control. No company will accept liability for a modification of their product. This said, Peregrine does offer advice on how to reduce friction and thus barrel fouling. You are correct in your understanding that Peregrine bullets foul less, but all copper bullets do foul. Fouling is caused by the interference between the barrel and the bullet. If the barrel is rough, fouling will be increased. Most new barrels look like rasps on the inside, which shaves off copper like a file. Try polishing the inside of your barrel with Iosso or JB bore paste. This will make a tremendous difference. Secondly, use a precision bullet. Peregrine bullets are precision machined to fit 5 micron under bore. Thus the interference is eliminated, resulting in less friction and thus less barrel fouling. Third, because Peregrine bullets are machined, the surface isn't work hardened as with rolled copper bullets. This means the softer Peregrine copper flows backwards easier during engraving and without depositing much if any copper on the barrel surface. Lastly, use one of the new powders like IMR Enduron 4166 or Hodgdon CFE223 that have anti-copperfouing additives.

 

7. Regarding the above issue of the effect of surface friction on bullet inertia: some manufacturers of these like Barnes and Swift give the valid advice to seat the first contact radial of the bullet some distance short of the rifling. Please can you share the Peregrine advice regarding this important issue for reloaders?

 

https://www.peregrinemonolithics.com/how-to-correctly-seat-peregrine-bullets/

Andries
Aug 31, 2017Edited: Sep 6, 2017

To our existing members, the above explanation has been answered by Hermann Weideman, resident in the USA. Welcome to the forum, Hermann.

 

I am sure that like me many readers of this forum should like to see some closer and detailed images of the different style bullets right here as we speak to have immediate visuals of what it is we are talking about.

 

Below is one image which says a lot already. Giraffe are tough - no different than a Cape buffalo and demand similar bullet considerations for killing it with one shot. A wounded giraffe is not dangerous in the sense of attacking but it will run headlong into anything in its way.

 

Franco Jooste of the sales dept at Peregrine South Africa with a rather big giraffe:

Franco is invited to sign up and tell us more about the following:

  • Type of rifle and calibre?

  • Which Peregrine bullet did he use?

  • Shot placement and the reaction to the shot by the bull?

  • Bullet path and internal performance?

  • Was the bullet recovered - and what did it look like? Weight retention?

 

Andries
Sep 3, 2017Edited: Sep 4, 2017

Regarding the question about bullet coating Hermann wrote:

 

"Much has been made of bullet coatings. Peregrine cannot suggest or endorse a specific type of coating, simply because the coating process is outside of Peregrine's control. No company will accept liability for a modification of their product. This said, Peregrine does offer advice on how to reduce friction and thus barrel fouling. You are correct in your understanding that Peregrine bullets foul less, but all copper bullets do foul. Fouling is caused by the interference between the barrel and the bullet. If the barrel is rough, fouling will be increased. Most new barrels look like rasps on the inside, which shaves off copper like a file. Try polishing the inside of your barrel with Iosso or JB bore paste. This will make a tremendous difference. Secondly, use a precision bullet. Peregrine bullets are precision machined to fit 5 micron under bore. Thus the interference is eliminated, resulting in less friction and thus less barrel fouling. Third, because Peregrine bullets are machined, the surface isn't work hardened as with rolled copper bullets. This means the softer Peregrine copper flows backwards easier during engraving and without depositing much if any copper on the barrel surface. Lastly, use one of the new powders like IMR Enduron 4166 or Hodgdon CFE223 that have anti-copperfouing additives."

 

Maybe my question was not clear enough. Peregrine does not use any coating on their bullets - any reason for that? Franco or Alliwyn?

 

Also, instead of posting links to the websites as an answer to questions I know that our regular members and casual readers of this forum appreciate a response by an individual. Such personal responses prompt new questions and thus understanding and acceptance grows. It is what the chat forum is about.

New Posts
  • Andries
    Jun 1, 2017

    Each week we shall review the technical features of a manufacturer's bullets and discuss the advantages and benefits of these to the user. Questions forwarded to each shall be posted and commented on and members are invited to join the discussion. The Category photo of the black wildebeest shows why a fairly heavy, well constructed cup and core bullet at below 2,600 ft/sec impact velocity is required to penetrate through the heart. At shooting distances below 180 yards on big game the typical high impact velocity of magnum cartridges invariably requires a premium bullet - particularly with those lighter than 160gr; the very reason these types came into existence. The skin, tendons, shoulder bone, then a rib, and then the repeat of all this at the opposite shoulder demands a strong bullet. Look at the giraffe bull being skinned below. In all respects it demands the same premium bullet weight and performance as does a Cape buffalo. There was a visiting hunter with a .300 Weatherby Magnum and 150gr soft nose bullets and quite correctly the ranch PH (left in the photo below) declined and offered his .375 H&H loaded with 340gr Rhino solid shank bullets for free. The client decided to hunt elsewhere.
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